Your body can't love you

Your body can't love you

Well, it can't, can it? And, yet, I spend an awful lot of time preoccupied by it. Perhaps that's what the circles are about? I don't know. If I did, I'd tear it up and begin again. This piece printed is deceptively delicate, a function of the color and the Japanese woodcut postage stamp. I take every chance I get to use these   stamps because they scale to reveal worlds. Other bits include: heavily distressed postcards, bits of a letter from mid 19th century and embossed pansies from a turn of 20th century birthday card.

Because you were pretty and a boy

Because you were pretty and a boy

Summer's over. And perhaps not just summer, but those years when summer was distinct from the rest of the year. In this piece, I've used both sides of a postcard, the reverse signed in the upper right with that curiously intimate "me"; the word "letters" from Marion & Joe's correspondence has floated to the surface more than once, and found its place here. The letters "w" and "e" appeared originally in a heavily foxed, oversized flash card. At scale, the halftone dots used in the trees are exquisite, as are the two strange reds: the brighter from a 50's era Marlboro advertisement and the other, of course, contributed by a raffle ticket.  

Fair, and ...

Fair, and ...

Bronze pigment printed on an Austrian tourist brochure echoes the shape of the orchid. Linen from a book cover, its trailing threads casting shadows. More from the same 18th century letter that appears in "Your body can't love you," as well as an edge of the inked paper that in that piece reads, "Aug 01."

The last of the garden

The last of the garden

A bouquet invoking the wildness that is a garden in fall. Stamp and postcard, the sister raffle ticket to that in, "Because you were pretty." The black strip is torn from a cigar loop saved for me by my father, and the fabric is from a label I found on a second hand blouse. More of the inked papers used in others of this set, and this one includes a small flower as well.

Dear darkening ground

Dear darkening ground

Still working daily with Rilke's Book of Hours, so the title comes from a poem there. Piece is comprised of hand altered papers, postcards and advertisements, as well as a board from an old book.

Commander Perry interdicts the slave trade and then opens Japan (with Dad's cigar band)

Commander Perry interdicts the slave trade and then opens Japan (with Dad's cigar band)

Materials list in the title on this one! The handwriting and stamp come from an issue of The Times London, 1833. The reader took notes, intermittently, on what articles he or she had read. I've also used bits of postcard.

You are not made of this world

You are not made of this world

A WWII era Japanese stamp is the center of this piece, surrounded by bits of postcard. The fabric comes from an old book.

I am made of longing

I am made of longing

Rilke, again. Postcard, and fabric from a book cover, as well as a WWII era money order.

I shall have no life

I shall have no life

Title derived from a sonnet by Pietro Bembo for Lucrezia Borgia. Also used in this piece are a botanical from American Flora, bits of letter and stamp; an advertisement from a 1900's era tour guide to Philadelphia and the corner of a WWII era yen.

It speaks in the same voice

It speaks in the same voice

I'm not sure where this snippet of text derives from, but it's one that recites itself in my mind. Used in this piece is the spine of a ledger, bits of an old letter, and postcard, as well as a piece of the very sheer paper that was placed over an image in old books. I typed on that bit with my Royal before I replaced the ribbon and in the 44" version of the print the unlinked strike mark of a letter "m" is visible.

This laboring of ours

This laboring of ours

From Rilke's "The Swan," of course. This is a postage stamp out of Australia, bits of old letter and envelope. 

Will

Will

Postcard and geological survey of Colorado from early in the last century, as well as handmade paper.

Fires of loss

Fires of loss

Mary Oliver's "Dogfish" (you must swim through the forest to stay / in this world) and "In Blackwater Woods" (the fires / and the black river of loss / whose other side //is salvation) typed on my circa 1925 Royal typewriter. Woodcut from an old book, and page from another book, flipped to highlight the impression of the type striking the paper.

Canada

Canada

Original assembled from a Japanese postage stamp, ink, sheet music, washi tape and handmade paper.

The Princess

The Princess

Original assembled from a children's book illustration, postage stamp, handmade paper and washi tape.

Please Hold Still

Please Hold Still

Original assembled from a children's book illustration circa 1933, postcard, postage cancel, bee stamp, washi tape and amathematics text, 1927.

Wilderness

Wilderness

Original assembled from the cover from photographic souvenir guide to Orleans, France, c. 1900, a butterfly sticker, ink & letter "R" stamp, and a page torn from The Literary Digest 1927 Atlas of the World and Gazetteer, 1927.

XK

XK

Original assembled from handmade Nepalese paper, washi tape, ink, mathematics textbook circa 1927 and commercially reproduced ledger page.

Toll

Toll

Original assembled from handmade Florentine and Nepalese papers, an Art Deco greeting card, washi tape and a postage stamp arranged on foxed endpaper.

 

 

 

Black Rising

Black Rising

Original assembled from moldered newspaper, handmade paper, contemporary postage cancel, architectural illustration.